novembre 10, 2012

The Joy of Short Stories @ Lou Sylvre's :)

Hello, dear friends!

I'm taking a break from frantically working on my Phd proposal (-20 days to deadline, just had words I need to radically re-structure the entire thing: yargh!). Lou Sylvre was so kind to interview me on her blog. We talked about settings, names, titles, hot characters, sharing hot excerpts... and my special fondness for short stories :)!

Here's an excerpt from the post:

Q: In what locale is your most recent book set? How compelling was it to set a story there? Do you choose location the same way every time? How?

A: The one thing that most of my settings have in common is – they aren’t real. But they usually aren’t 100% fantasy either. Let’s just say I like – tweaking reality, adding stuff to it, bending its rules. It’s probably got something to do with my love for magical realism. I always find it especially intriguing: there’s a base of reality, so you come into it with all sorts of logical expectations, and yet at every turn there might just be something unusual, absurd, magical popping up and turning all your certainties upside down. I find it exciting, that added layer of possibilities to a world that already offers so many; I love the added degree of freedom it allows, and the fun that comes with playing with the expected and unexpected, the unreal juxtaposed on the real.

In fact, most of my stories are set in a world that’s never grounded – no dates, no exact locations, no names, no definite reality. I like that, and I think it works for me because I mostly write short stories, and they have different rules than full-length novels. I love the idea of tuning in to whatever’s happening, wherever’s happening, and simpy watching it unfold for a while before departing again. Not every question is answered; this isn’t a full meal, it’s a bite, a savoury morsel. The story I’m currently editing follows this rule, too. It’s set in a circus – an old-fashioned circus, in a setting that has some historical features, but remains open to other possibilities. The atmosphere is steampunk-ish, even though there are no actual steampunk elements. I’d been wanting to play with a circus setting for a long time, and while I hope to use it in a longer piece soon, this was a very enjoyable start!

I guess I could sum up this ramble by saying that I really enjoy speculative fiction, and I similarly enjoy speculative settings – the ones that always leave you guessing!

Q: Are readers involved in making your fiction—do they suggest stories or say what they’d like to read?

A: A little, yes! Mostly, I get many requests for sequels to my short stories. Often I’m tempted too; as I was mentioning, my short stories are often but a bite of something much bigger and more complex. I get to describe glimpses of fantastic worlds, introduce strange characters, hint at legends and mysterious pasts… and I’m left wanting more too; I want to keep exploring that world, to know more about those characters, to learn everything there is to know.

But unfortunately, I am also very easily distracted: when I get a new shiny toy (= a brand new sparkling idea) all I want to do is dive into that next world that I still know nothing about and explore that. Since I have more ideas than I can write – I currently have 12 full plots competing for my attention, and clamoring when they get bumped back yet again in favour of the latest idea! – I end up never having the time to go dust off a world and characters I’ve already played with to see what else they might have to say. I’m terrible, I know! But I keep them neatly lined up on their shelf anyway, and dust them every now and then. They are always ready for action. So, dear readers, please don’t give up hope – hopefully I’ll get around to writing one of those sequels someday :)


Read the rest of the post HERE!